May 23, 2024

Centre of Expertise on Child Sexual Abuse

The Centre is funded by the Home Office.

It is ‘hosted’ by Barnados.

There are several statements, which appear to be aims and objectives. In summary the Centre want  to:

  • Ensure all children are free from CSA.
  • Reduce the impact of CSA.
  • Improve prevention, through better understanding of sexual abusive behaviour and perpetration.
  • Improve responses to CSA.
  • Improve the priority given to CSA, by improving understanding of its scale and nature.
  • Address gaps in knowledge, through sharing research and evidence.
  • Provide training and support for researchers working in the field.
  • Influence policy.

Research team.

They have a ‘scale and nature’ of CSA research programme:

  1. Reporting on what is known and not known.
  2. Trying to get a CSA prevalence study done.
  3. Publish a guide to support improved data collection amongst organisations.
  4. Improve understanding on how LA practice impacts on CSA stats.

In their latest report on what is known they find:

  1. More concerns about CSA were reported in 21-22.

List of reports

  1. Improving your data on child sexual abuse: a practical guide for organisations, 2023
  2. Child sexual abuse in 2021/22: Trends in official data
  3. The scale and nature of child sexual abuse: review of evidence, 2021 revision.
  4. Improving agency data on child sexual abuse: A pilot study of the child sexual abuse data collection template. 2019.
  5. Measuring the scale and changing nature of child sexual abuse: analysis of 2017/18 official and agency data.
  6. A review of international survey methodology on child sexual abuse and child sexual exploitation. 2018

Improving your data on child sexual abuse: a practical guide for organisations, 2023

  1. CSA Centre presents a core data collection template.
  2. Covers victims, perpetrators, context and service involvement.
  3. First published 19, updated 23.

Child sexual abuse in 2021/22: Trends in official data

  1. Centre reckons 1 in 10 children have suffered CSA, but that official data suggests the figure is lower.
  2. But that anyway, official data report 15% more concerns than year before.
  3. LA data varied, suggesting different responses to CSA in LAs.

The scale and nature of child sexual abuse: review of evidence, 2021 revision.

  1. 2009 NSPCC found 1 in 4 of adults reported CSA (experiences under 18).
  2. CSEW reported 1 in 12 children (up to 16).
  3. Report authors estimate 1 in 8 female CYP experience CSA, 1 in 20 boys, before age of 16.
  4. Most CSA done by males.
  5. CYP tend not to disclose at time of abuse, but if they do, they tell a friend or family member.
  6. Neglected children (x5), in care (x4) girls (x3) or disabled (x2) more likely to be abused.
  7. Don’t know in which direction CSA prevalence is heading.

Improving agency data on child sexual abuse: A pilot study of the child sexual abuse data collection template. 2019.

  1. Piloted template across a handful of LAs, police forces and vols.
  2. Pilot sites were collecting most of the data.
  3. They weren’t collecting some perpetrator & context stats.
  4. Only data demographics were reportable, other data captured in narrative form.

Measuring the scale and changing nature of child sexual abuse: analysis of 2017/18 official and agency data.

  1. Report focuses on what is reported, not prevalence of abuse.
  2. Time lag between experience and reporting.
  3. Some groups under-represented: boys, BAME YP.
  4. Variations in rates of reported CSA across authorities do not reflect variations incidence of CSA.
  5. Little information on victims, perpetrators, contexts.
  6. UK government should do a CSA prevalence study.
  7. Various data, struggles with the so what’s.
  8. 1 in 6 recorded offences results in a charge, of which 3/4 result in conviction.

A review of international survey methodology on child sexual abuse and child sexual exploitation. 2018

  1. Definitions and measures of CSA varied, some focused on penetration, others involved non-contact abuse.
  2. Questions which focus on concrete behaviours (rather than abstract concepts like abuse, rape, molested, which require interpretation) get a better response rate.
  3. Surveys, which ask about all types of perpetrator, deliver a higher response rate.
  4. Convenience and clinical sampling deliver higher rates than random.

 

They have training programmes for professionals and organisations.

 

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